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Kyawthuite was found in Mogok, Mandalay Region. Photo: Supplied
Formula: Bi3+Sb5+O4
System: Monoclinic
Colour: Reddish orange
Hardness:

Well-known as a synthetic compound. The only approved Bi-Sb oxide mineral. May be a chemical analogue of clinobisvanite, BiVO4, but the space groups are slightly different. Not analogous to bismutocolumbite or bismutotantalite.
So it was that kyawthuite was born.

“This is the first in the world. It is not found in other countries,” U Kyaw Thu told The Myanmar Times last week.

The precious stone was originally found by gems prospectors in Chaung Gyi village, Mogok township – Myanmar’s famed “Ruby Land” – part of Mandalay Region. Not realising its uniqueness, the finders set the raw stone out for sale at a market, where U Kyaw Thu saw it and discerned something special.




“From studying in the field and buying stones from the Khanae market, [I could tell that] this stone was a little strange and I bought it. Then, when I reached Yangon, I examined it [and determined that] this was not like any other gem we’ve ever found,” U Kyaw Thu said.

Although he purchased the stone in 2010, confirming its rarity was difficult in Myanmar, so he cooperated with experts from the United States and the International Mineralogical Association. In December 2015, the latter recognised it as the first ever discovered in the world, he said.

U Kyaw Thu has largely kept quiet about the mineral named after him, pending confirmation from the International Mineralogical Association.

The stone is currently being exhibited at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County in the United States. The museum’s bi-monthly magazine early this year boasted of having added “the world’s rarest gem to its collection”.

The kyawthuite stone is reddish orange in colour and weighs in at 1.61 carat.

Translation by Khine Thazin Han The Mineralogical information from Mindat.

Post a Comment

Anna Costello Wisniewski said... September 30, 2016 at 4:40 PM

wait...they say it's synthetic, but it was found in nature? confused.

Unknown said... October 2, 2016 at 1:33 PM

No, they say that this mineral was already well known as a synthetic compound but it is the first time that a naturally occuring crystal is found.

 
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